SPIRITUALITY, FAIR TRADE AND SOCIAL JUSTICE
17
September
2013

Reflection for the Week of September 17th

In the first paragraph of this article a statistic is stated that really captured my attention; “The gap between the rich and the poor is widening, with the world’s richest 20% consuming over 75% of the world’s resources while the world’s poorest 20% consumer only 1.5%.” This is stated to capture a reader’s attention and begin to explain why issues of Fair Trade need to exist. Fair Trade works to improve the quality of life of those who need it most while giving them also giving them confidence, self worth, and a sense of dignity.
This statistic really stood out to me because so often I feel like things are too expensive for me as a college student. Textbooks seem to cost a fortune, my college education has put me in debt, trying to dress in the newest trends quickly shrinks my bank account ,and leisure trips to the city tend to add up rather quickly. But when I really take a step back to think about it, I have everything I need. I have clothes, shelter, food to eat at every meal, and my health. In life, these are the things we take for granted. The fact that there are some without these necessary items is baffling and seems to open a space in my life to work to make the world a little better.
This article also includes a short description about a husband and a wife, Ganesh and Nanda who used Fair Trade to help disadvantaged children. The couple makes Nepali drums and instruments that are sold in both retail and wholesale markets. The profits from sales have improved the couple’s life and they have used what is left over to open a shelter for disadvantaged children. The home, Mitrata, was opened 10 years ago and provides food, shelter, education, and a home for about 100 children in the community.
The home is Nanda’s passion and it was so inspiring reading about someone so selfless even when she does not have much for herself. Nanda reminded me very much of my own mother who too is a very selfless role model. Though not exactly like Nanda, my mom gave up her career after my sister and I were born to be a stay at home mom. When we went off to kindergarten, she did not feel she could return to work because she wanted to be home with us every time we were sick, had a day off from school, were home for summer vacation, and for all of our extra circular activities. She opened her own day care from our house which she has successfully run for the past 20 years. Having my mom home has truly meant the world to me, but watching her give love and kindness to the children who come to our house each day is beyond words. Like my mom, Nanda is an admirable woman who has devoted her life to helping others.



« Blog Post #2Second Reflection Post: »


More blog posts in this category Common
Additional information about "Reflection for the Week of September 17th"
Stay up to date!
Like this Blog
Latest blog posts in the category Common

Sign up, to leave a comment


Write a comment for "Reflection for the Week of September 17th"

EMPI-Fordham
Visitors
0 Members and 1 Guest are online.

We welcome our newest member: affeldtsalestax
guest counter
Today were 9 (yesterday 42) guests online.

Board Statistics
The forum has 13 topics and 34 posts.

0 members have been online today:


Visitor record: 55 users on Thu Feb 01, 2024 9:44 am..